FOR SALE BY OWNER

Drovers Tavern

4065 Pompey Hollow Road Cazenovia, NY

 

A ONE-0F-A-KIND OFFERING: HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT, EARLY 1800s DROVERS TAVERN IN CAZENOVIA, NY

The sale of 4065 Pompey Hollow Road in Cazenovia, New York presents discerning real estate purchasers with the rare opportunity to own a treasured piece of American history, and a property of great historic significance and pedigree just 12 miles east of Syracuse. Cultivated buyers seeking a private oasis, functional farm, and an excellent place to raise a family in a classic period home, or those with a unique interest in history, preservation and culture.

An Historic Icon. Situated on 114 sprawling, picturesque acres of land, Drovers Tavern has changed hands several times over the centuries but has remained prized and cherished. Though a small portion of the historic brick Colonial was built earlier, the main portion was initially constructed circa 1818-1820 by Colonel James Stanley, Jr., who owned the property until 1836. From that time until 1859 when Noah Palmer acquired it, the property had several owners, but for the most part was used as an overnight stopping place for early cattlemen who in those days had to drive their herds to the New York market on foot, as the Erie Canal and commercial railroads were not yet built.

Not only did hospitality need to be provided for the drovers (hence the sign on the front of the inn, “Entertainment for Travelers and Drovers” that still remains), but provision had to be made for the necessary care of the animals, with barns, corrals and pastures, etc. for the stock. This working farm has not only been the breeding ground for many kinds of livestock, but has supported plentiful crops including apple orchards. Drovers Tavern was also a popular gathering spot for the surrounding countryside, with dances often underway in the huge second floor hall.

In 1929, Melville and Dorothy Clark took ownership of Drovers Tavern. The Clark family was noteworthy in many regards, with a well-known family business, Clark Music, makers of the Clark Irish Harp, which was in existence in Syracuse from 1859 until 2012. Melville Clark’s uncle Melville achieved fame as the inventor of the Apollo player piano, and both men held numerous patents, as did Melville Clark, Jr., a physicist working on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The house was filled with antiques as well as the harps and pianos built by the family, creating a musical-inspired ambiance that promoted industrious and inventive thought. This property could certainly make an ideal personal harp and player piano museum, among many other attractive possibilities. The Clarks also ran the property as a working farm through the Depression era.

A Home of Distinction. With respect to its integrity, the Clarks honored the tradition of the home by carefully restoring it without significantly altering its original character. The current owners who bought Drovers Tavern in 1979 have lovingly done the same, while installing thoughtful upgrades including a new roof to ensure luxury and longevity.

The U.S. Department of Interior and NYS Historic Preservation Field Service Bureau donned this esteemed relic as “…an outstanding and highly intact representation of vernacular Federal-style architecture in Onondaga County, New York.” … “The Tavern is additionally significant under criterion A for its associative value in illustrating the growth and settlement patterns characteristic of central New York following the conclusion of the American Revolution.”

The Department of the Interior photographed and documented the property in 1934 in recognition of that significance, and the photos can be found in the Library of Congress Archives.

Designed for Living. The expansive two-story home – configured with 4 bedrooms and an office on the second level plus two and a half baths – welcomes you into an excellent condition foyer that proudly displays the original signage for the Tavern. Extensive woodwork, - three working fireplaces and a gas burning wood stove including a configuration with Dutch oven and other prized period elements grace the spacious interior that is a stunning statement of rustic charm and refined elegance. Formal living and dining rooms invite entertaining, while a beautifully-crafted open concept kitchen with wood beamed ceilings and huge picture windows offers a well-equipped and comfortable setting for meal preparation.

Gatherings can easily spill out to the generously-proportioned elevated decking overlooking the elaborate pool facility, pristine landscaping, enchanting gazebo and stone patio. The second story that houses the large master bedroom can also accommodate a substantial number of people, with doors that extend the space into a ballroom.

The stretching exterior grounds provide a backdrop of beauty and peacefulness, which can be savored from the numerous private outdoor spaces including the gazebo, and by the magical pool. The property also contains an impeccable-condition three level carriage house to accommodate three cars and a large two story multi-use barn.

Drovers Tavern is conveniently located midway between Cazenovia and Manlius, 12 miles east of Syracuse, NY. The owners are enthusiastic to sell the property to the next steward of this important historical American gem.

 

 

Property description:

Drovers Tavern is located midway between Cazenovia and Manlius 12 miles east of Syracuse, NY. It is situated on 114 acres of land. The main portion of the house was built 1818-1820. And a smaller portion was built ~ 1803.

It is currently configured with 4 bedrooms and an office on the 2nd level with two full baths. And it has a half bath on the first level. It has five working fireplaces including an early configuration with Dutch oven and period implements.

It has an open kitchen concept that leads out to extensive elevated decking over looking an elaborate pool facility, landscaping, gazebo and stone patio.

There are two barns. The horse barn has been reconfigured to accommodate two cars. The cow barn was built ~ 1940 as replacement for original that burned.


Significance:

According to the US Department of Interior and NYS Historic Preservation Field Service Bureau paperwork:

Drovers Tavern is an “.....outstanding and highly intact representation of vernacular Federal-style architecture in Onondaga County, New York.” “...The Tavern is additionally significant under criterion A for its associative value in illustrating the growth and settlement patterns characteristic of central New York following the conclusion of the American Revolution.” The Department of the Interior photographed and documented the property in 1934 in recognition of that significance and the photos can be found in the Library of Congress Archives.

Historical summary: The main portion of the house was built 1818-1820 by Colonel James Stanley Jr. Who held the property until 1836. There were a half dozen owners between 1836 and 1859 when Noah Palmer acquired it. In 1929 Melville and Dorothy Clark purchased the property and the family held it until 1979 when it was sold to the current owner.

It is reported that the property had been used as a Travelers and Drovers Tavern likely up until about 1859. It appears that use may have started ~ 1836.


Potential use:

The Clark family, noteworthy for the family business Clark Music, makers of the Clark Irish Harp, in Syracuse from 1859 until 2012 used it as a homestead/working farm to supplement their music business which struggled during the depression. Melville Clarks uncle also named Melville was the inventor of the Apollo Player piano. He had numerous patents credited to him as did the property owner Melville Clark and so did Melville Clark Jr. who went on to become a Physicist working on the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos New Mexico.

 

THe family was resourceful but not immune to the ravages of the depression era. The farm assured the family had food to eat.


The house was filled with antiques as well as the Harps and pianos built by the family. It is a musical place that promoted industrious and inventive thought. The Clarks also ran the property as a working farm thru the Depression era and beyond raising beef cattle, milk cows, horses, goats and chickens. They also gew cord and oats and apples.

The property is in a convenient location easily commutable to Syracuse. It is a functional farm and a great place to raise a family in a classic period home of historical significance.


The Clarks honored the tradition of the home by carefully restoring it without altering significantly its original character. The current owner since 1979 has done the same.


The property has supported many crops including apple orchards. All kinds of livestock has been bred and raised there. It is a classic historic homestead.

I think it also would make for a great personal Harp and Player Piano museum.

It is a place for cultivated persons with interest in history and preservation, music and family.

We are looking for the next steward of this important piece of American history.

The house and barns reside on 6.3 acres depicted in blue. There is additional 107.91 acres.

 

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